The McLean First-Episode Psychosis Project: six-month recovery and recurrence outcome. Academic Article uri icon

start page

  • 273

end page

  • 282

abstract

  • The McLean First-Episode Psychosis project began in 1989. The authors describe the study design, diagnostic distribution, and recovery and relapse data on the first 102 recruited subjects. Fifty-nine percent of the subjects had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, 15 percent psychotic depression, 10 percent schizophrenic spectrum, 9 percent delusional disorder, and 8 percent other psychotic disorders. By 6 months, 80 percent recovered syndromically but only 55 percent recovered functionally, and only 50 percent recovered both functionally and syndromically. Non-white and male patients were more likely to have a recurrence. Men were less likely and bipolar patients were more likely to recover functionally. Patients with nonaffective psychosis had longer hospitalizations and lower rates of functional recovery 6 months after discharge.

date/time value

  • 1992

PubMed Identifier

  • 1621073

volume

  • 18

number

  • 2

keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Cohort Studies
  • Continental Population Groups
  • Female
  • Hospitalization
  • Hospitals, Psychiatric
  • Humans
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Length of Stay
  • Male
  • Massachusetts
  • Prognosis
  • Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
  • Psychotic Disorders
  • Research Design
  • Sex Factors
  • United States