Economic, clinical, and quality-of-life outcomes associated with olanzapine treatment in mania. Results from a randomized controlled trial. Academic Article uri icon

start page

  • 109

end page

  • 118

abstract

  • The objectives of this study were to determine the economic, clinical, and quality-of-life outcomes associated with olanzapine treatment in patients diagnosed with mania.Patients with a diagnosis of bipolar I disorder with manic or mixed episodes were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. The study design comprised a 3-week acute phase followed by a 49-week open label extension. In the open label extension, the use of lithium and fluoxetine was permitted for patients who experienced breakthrough symptoms. Clinical, economic, and quality-of-life outcomes of treatment were assessed.During the acute phase, olanzapine patients experienced a statistically significant greater mean improvement from baseline on the Y-MRS total score compared to the placebo patients. In the open label extension, patients experienced a statistically significant mean change of 11.8 units on the Y-MRS from the end of the acute phase. When compared to costs incurred in the previous 12 months of therapy, patients experienced savings of almost $900 per month during the 49 weeks of olanzapine therapy. These cost savings were largely driven by reductions in in-patient costs during the open label extension. Health-related quality of life improvements measured by the SF-36 were seen on several dimensions both in the 3-week acute phase as well as in the 49-week open label extension.From a clinical, economic, and quality-of-life outcomes standpoint, olanzapine had a significant impact in the treatment of mania, and could be considered a cost-effective treatment option for use in this population if these findings are extrapolated to non-clinical trial populations.

date/time value

  • May 2002

PubMed Identifier

  • 12103458

volume

  • 69

number

  • 1-3

keywords

  • Adult
  • Antipsychotic Agents
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Costs and Cost Analysis
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Pirenzepine
  • Quality of Life